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PostPosted: Mon Jul 06, 2009 1:09 pm 
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in both short and long fiction; any reccomendations?


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 06, 2009 2:33 pm 
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Off the top of my head...

I think a lot of Dick's stuff, with its underlying paranoia, should appeal to readers coming in from a horror direction, especially "A Scanner Darkly", and the same could be said about much of Ballard's work, such as "Crash", "High-Rise" and "Concrete Island".

Vampires, werewolves etc, either explained scientifically, or as aliens/another race would give you "The Vampire Tapestry" by Suzy McKee Charnas, Jack Williamson's "Darker Than You Think", the Philip Jose Farmer trilogy beginning with "Image of the Beast" (possibly the silliest novel ever, but great fun regardless), Colin Wilson's "Space Vampires" (haven't read the book, but film "Lifeforce" is pretty good").

Mental powers gone awry has Silverberg's "Dying Inside".

Any end of the world scenario, even involving zombies, has the potential to be SF as much as horror, such as "The Stand" by King, of course, "One" by Conrad Williams and "Earth ABides" by George R Stewart.

In short stories there's a lot of work by Ellison, Sturgeon, Martin, Shepard, Moorcock and Ballard that could go either way, depending on your own labelling instincts.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 06, 2009 8:43 pm 
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Frankenstein is the daddy, and Stevensons'sStrange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde probably also counts. Wells certainly straddles the fields with The Island of Dr Moreau

There's also Richard Matheson's I Am Legend (scientifically justified vampires), Lucius Shepherd's Green Eyes (ditto zombies) and Dan Simmons's Carrion Comfort (bit of both).

Don A. Stuart (John W. Campbell Jr) produced an excellent short story in Who Goes There? (The second film adaption - The Thing - is closer to the source than the first).

Much of John Shirley's work folds itself between the genres as well.

I'm sure there's plenty more where that came from. I've also thought of quite a few that I wouldn't recommend.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 06, 2009 9:22 pm 
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Theodore Sturgeon's novel 'The Dreaming Jewels' might be considered to have an element of horror - though maybe dark fantasy describes it better (never sure of these genre boundaries!).

A lot of Ray Bradbury's short stories have a horror element - 'The Veldt' is one that springs to mind. And there are few beasts more sinister than the 'mechanical hound' that appears in "Fahrenheit 451".

I think an argument could made for a horror element in John Wyndham's books - especially The Midwich Cuckoos.

An element of gothic horror is often to be found in steampunk - K.W. Jeter's "Infernal Devices" for example.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 06, 2009 10:43 pm 
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I'd say the first Alien movie fit that cross genre mould so Van Vogt's 'Voyage of the Space Beagle' which contains the original version of the idea, in one of its sections, fits the bill.

Murray Leinster's Mad Planet is another 'golden age' oldie that does the same.

Some of the stories in Black Static as well. Do I need to name them?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2009 12:01 am 
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Practically everything by Fritz Lieber.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2009 10:01 am 
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Roy wrote:
I'd say the first Alien movie fit that cross genre mould...

Yes, and also The Thing (John Carpenter's version - haven't seen the old one).

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2009 6:12 pm 
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Some of Lovecraft's stuff such as The Colour Out of Space.

Invasion of the Body Snatchers by Jack Finney. Although to be honest I don't think the book's anywhere near as scary as the first two film versions.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 7:32 am 
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William Hope Hodgson's The House on the Borderland is marketed as Horror, Fantasy or SF depending who's publishing it. And his Carnacki The Ghost Finder features scientific methods of ghost detection in amongst the occult stuff.

Michael Marshall Smith mixes SF with Horror in various novels and short stories. Offhand Only Forward and 'Hell Hath Enlarged Herself' are your best bets.

Joe R Lansdale's Drive-In novels don't feature any hard SF but the surreal shenanigans are all down to aliens.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:03 am 
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Steven King's The Dark Tower series is certainly a cross-genre tale that has both SF (multiple universes, robots etc etc) and horror (mutants, wolves that steal childrens' minds) plus even fantasy.
King has stated that he got the idea from Browning's poem, Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came.
It's a long series and wonderfully weird, however, you will either hate or feel a little numb with the end of it all, after all this time I still don't know exactly how I feel about its conclusion!

The first book is 'The Gunslinger' and starts with a sentence I'll always remember :

'The man in black fled across the desert, and The Gunslinger followed...'

Simple, I know, but it's one of those opening sentences in a book that tends to stick.

This is a link to King's site which has a reading by George Guidall of the first chapter, well worth a listen:

http://www.stephenking.com/DarkTower/the_gunslinger.html

Bob

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:35 am 
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Only read one of his books but, to judge from cross-genre content of various film & TV adaptations, I would have thought Dean Koontz was the uncrowned king of modern sci-fi horrors.

One of the best SF-horror short stories is We Purchased People by Fred Pohl. I think it was published back in the 1970s, and it's very memorable as a disturbing twist on the 'body-snatchers' idea.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 1:08 pm 
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cheers people! that has given me a nice large list to try and peruse :D


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 09, 2009 3:01 pm 
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Benedict, I seem to remember you are a Black Static, as opposed to Iz, subscriber. There are some stories from Iz that I think fit your cross genre category and some of these are on the podcast site. If you've tried, or try, them let us know if you think they fit the bill.

Transmission 1: The Algorithm by Tim Akers
Transmission 16: Feelings of the Flesh by Douglas Cohen though some might argue it's fantasy, not SF
Transmission 17: Toke by Tim Akers


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 09, 2009 3:10 pm 
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cheers roy! i'll give those a peek later.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 09, 2009 3:11 pm 
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oh and im considering getting someone to sort me out an IZ sub for my birthday later in the year.


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