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What Book(s) Are You Currently Reading
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Author:  Paul Woodward [ Wed Aug 17, 2011 6:37 pm ]
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I'm reading Fairyland by Paul McAuley but I've got to move on and start the new one by Christoper Ransom for review
:)

Author:  StevePalmer [ Thu Aug 18, 2011 8:39 am ]
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Paul Woodward wrote:
I'm reading Fairyland by Paul McAuley...
:)


classic! :D

Author:  Rob McCow [ Thu Aug 18, 2011 3:55 pm ]
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StevePalmer wrote:
I remember this being reported, wasn't it that he just didn't have enough room for them?


Yeah, although I suppose there was the charitable aspect plus the thought that he might not want to read all of the Star Trek tie-in novels again.

There was some great stuff in the collection, but there was a lot of stuff that uh... I didn't find quite so appealing. I don't know if Brian was collecting these for review purposes or whether he had genuinely read them all.

I should go and have another look as there was no way that there were 5,000 books on display, more like a few hundred.

Author:  Pete [ Fri Aug 19, 2011 6:32 pm ]
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Finished "Viking Dead". Now back to 'holiday' reading with "Blinded" by Stephen White, the latest adventure for psychologist Alan Gregory, whose patient has just told him that she thinks her husband is a serial killer (White is better than the Kellermans, according to The Guardian).

Quote:
Paul Woodward wrote:-
start the new one by Christoper Ransom for review


Paul, or anyone else, did you read his second novel, and if so what was it like? I got sent a review copy, but sadly didn't get round to it.

Author:  Andrew Hook [ Mon Aug 22, 2011 9:19 am ]
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Back from a couple of weeks holiday during which I finished Conrad's "Heart of Darkness" (I think my prior perception of this book tarnished the reading experience unfortunately), Ian McEwan's "Saturday" which I greatly enjoyed, and Phillipe Djian's "Betty Blue" which genuinely made me cry (I can only think of a couple of other books ever to do that). Now reading a Charlie Chan mystery, "The House Without A Key", by Earl Derr Biggers which is starting to get intriguing.

Author:  Ray [ Mon Aug 22, 2011 9:51 am ]
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Unfortunately I read Saturday right after Enduring Love and found it rather similar in lots of ways and it spoiled it a bit for me. Plus I heard MvcEwan described as middle class porn once and the image has kinda stuck!

Congrats with the new Black Static acceptance by the way.

Author:  Andrew Hook [ Mon Aug 22, 2011 11:52 am ]
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Ray wrote:
Unfortunately I read Saturday right after Enduring Love and found it rather similar in lots of ways and it spoiled it a bit for me. Plus I heard MvcEwan described as middle class porn once and the image has kinda stuck!


I see what you mean - it's the first McEwan I'd read since Black Dogs (which I didn't like), so I'll probably delve into his back catalogue.

Ray wrote:
Congrats with the new Black Static acceptance by the way.


Cheers!

Author:  Ray [ Mon Aug 22, 2011 1:42 pm ]
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I liked early stuff, the comfort of strangers and also concrete garden, and a strange short story about a writing monkey...

Author:  Tony [ Mon Aug 22, 2011 1:55 pm ]
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Ray wrote:
I liked early stuff, the comfort of strangers
...

I remember the film version of TCOS (adapted by Pinter, directed by Schrader) was quite good, especially for the scene where Christopher Walken punches Rupert Everett!
:lol:

Author:  Pete [ Mon Aug 22, 2011 4:16 pm ]
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McEwan has his uses - e.g. for striking up conversations with strange women on train journeys (Andrew will understand that remark) or sending really rude text messages under the pretence of being literary - though I reckon his early work was his best, and lost interest around the time of "Black Dogs" and "Amsterdam".

Finished "Blinded" by Stephen White, which was a fun read, but the writer had to come up with some really tortured motivation for his two main characters to act as they did. Now started "Birdman" by Mo Hayder, which I must have had hanging around for years.

Author:  Pete [ Fri Aug 26, 2011 8:13 am ]
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Finished "Birdman" and rather liked it, with some good characters and a memorable bad guy, plus lashings of gore, though I guessed most of the twists and thought at times it depended a little bit too much on police incompetence and people never picking up their phones.

Now started "Acceptable Loss" by Anne Perry, a Victorian detective story. I've read and enjoyed quite a few of Perry's books, but none for a while, so when Headline sent me a review copy of this, just when I was planning a historical feature for the next Black Static, it seemed like a valid excuse to get reacquainted with her work.

Author:  Alexander Stark [ Fri Aug 26, 2011 9:18 am ]
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Just finished James Hogg's "The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner". Published in 1824, and one of the earliest "gothic" horror novels, influencing things like Jekyll and Hyde. An astute study of schizophrenia, a century before the term was even coined, it's a weird and terrifying journey through the mind of a (murderous) madman. Also a savage critique of fundamentalist religion (Calvinisn, our Scottish brand of puritanism). I didn't think I believed in the Devil, but his appearance in this book, as a metaphor or a projection (who can say?) makes him horribly tangible and indelible in the mind. Disturbing but powerful stuff. Worth persisting through the sometimes archaic language and dialect.

Author:  Pete [ Tue Aug 30, 2011 10:53 am ]
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Finished "Acceptable Loss", and very impressed by the moral conundrums Perry subjects her characters to. Now dividing my reading time between "No Second Chance" (my first Harlan Coben - and he seems to have a slight "Friends" fetish going on, with his hero married to a Monica but still holding the torch for a Rachel), and historic horror "The Third Section" by Jasper Kent, though with that I haven't got further than the historic backdrop in the opening pages.

Author:  Paul Woodward [ Tue Aug 30, 2011 9:00 pm ]
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Quote:
Paul Woodward wrote:-
start the new one by Christoper Ransom for review

Paul, or anyone else, did you read his second novel, and if so what was it like? I got sent a review copy, but sadly didn't get round to it.


Pete, No I'm afraid not, this is the first one I've had. Its quite racy, I suspect its in a style, so you might want to have a go at it.

Author:  Mike A [ Wed Aug 31, 2011 1:40 pm ]
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Recently finished The City & The City. A great idea, nicely developed - very impressive.

Now reading Teatro Grotesco (short stories) by Thomas Ligotti and On Writing by Stephen King.

Listening to the audiobook of The Hunger Games (YA SF) by Suzanne Collins.

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