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PostPosted: Fri Aug 10, 2012 4:21 pm 
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Ray wrote:
Considering the style of the one I'm reading at the moment, it doesn't seen very Burke at all to use the supernatural. But then I thought the same about early Connolly and look what he went and did.


Burke uses supernatural elements in a few of the Robicheaux novels. He's actually a big influence on John Connolly. I didn't like Burke when I first read him -- too slow-moving, too po-faced -- but went back to him after I started reading Connolly because JC rated him so much. I've now read the first half dozen or so Robicheaux books -- including two I hadn't liked previously -- and enjoyed them quite a lot. I think reading Connolly helped acclimatise me to Burke's style -- when I first read Connolly I thought to myself, "This reads like Burke, only more accessible." It was a year or two later before I found out that Burke is one of Connolly's favourite writers.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 8:03 am 
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Back on track for the weekend, finishing off "A Book of Horrors" edited by Stephen Jones and the collection "Bluegrass Symphony" by Lisa L. Hannett.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 12:06 pm 
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[quote="Stu Burke uses supernatural elements in a few of the Robicheaux novels. He's actually a big influence on John Connolly. I didn't like Burke when I first read him -- too slow-moving, too po-faced -- but went back to him after I started reading Connolly because JC rated him so much. I've now read the first half dozen or so Robicheaux books -- including two I hadn't liked previously -- and enjoyed them quite a lot. I think reading Connolly helped acclimatise me to Burke's style -- when I first read Connolly I thought to myself, "This reads like Burke, only more accessible." It was a year or two later before I found out that Burke is one of Connolly's favourite writers.[/quote]

I've read a couple now, and I'm enjoying them. Funnily enough, I went off Connolly when he became more overtly supernatural, having enjoyed his previous subtlty, but now I might give him another go.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2012 6:35 pm 
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Yeah, the shift in tone in the Connolly's Parker series took me a bit by surprise at first but I'm enjoying them. And his Samuel Johnson comedy-horror series for kids.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2012 8:03 pm 
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Just read "Gorel and the Pot-Bellied God" by Lavie Tidhar, which was a lot of fun, and reminded me very much of Jack Vance's Cugel stories, with a smidgen of Howard and Leiber.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 15, 2012 3:33 pm 
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I'm reading Keith Brooke's The Accord, and am at page 120 of 442. It's an exciting work about virtual and real reality. If you think that life in one virtual reality plus its base in our physical world is interesting but hard to describe accurately, then I strongly recommend this book. At times it deals with several 'instances' of its characters, each in one of a number of virtual realities, transmigrations of instances between virtual realities (I'm simplifying), and connections between this totality and the one physical world. Or so it seems. Reading The Accord is demanding but fun, and I do not know what further complications will be introduced. I'm looking forward to them.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 12:28 pm 
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Just finished "Gutshot", edited by Conrad Williams.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2012 7:59 am 
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The Hobbit

just wanted to check what Tolkien wrote before I see the film in a few months... :roll:

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2012 11:46 am 
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I enjoyed Gutshot- had an amazing story by Gary McMahon in it, a real departure from the urban bleak that he's so brilliant at. Finished my glut of zombie lit and also Visions Fading Fast which had some top-notch writing in it.
By way of a massively unsubtle plug I'm reading through Darker Minds because, even though I've read all the stories during editing and selection it's such a pretty thing I can't help flicking through it. (Here endeth the plug).
Alongside that I've started a collection of stories by some bloke called M.R. James.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 9:29 am 
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Related to E L James maybe. :D

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 9:50 am 
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Related to E L James maybe.


Could be, there are two stories in there called An Evening's Entertainment and After Dark in the Playing Fields...

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 9:54 am 
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And they're both writing about 'shades' :evil:

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2012 7:58 am 
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Over the weekend finished "Shadow Plays" by Reggie Oliver, which consists of a play about the life of M. R. James plus a selection of stories from Oliver's first two collections.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 28, 2012 9:53 am 
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Been away for a couple of weeks, during which time I read "The Lost District", a collection of stories by Joel Lane, which was excellent as expected (can't believe this sat unread for so long on my shelves), and "Bear v Shark" by Chris Bachelder (kind of a comic satire on US media) which was also enjoyable.

Picked up "A State of Denmark" by Derek Raymond to read at work and "The Martian Chronicles" by Ray Bradbury to read at home.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 29, 2012 8:36 am 
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Andrew Hook wrote:
....once I've bought the Thompson it might be a while before it gets read :)


Just to point out the spelling is without the p: "Thomson".

Also, in the end I wasn't as pleased with The Insult as I had been with The Five Gates of Hell. It just wandered off. Still good writing, but not as genre-directed as someone like Joyce, who intentionally relates to the mentality of the genre-reader, whereas my impression is that Thomson is a literary writer with a surreal instinct, but no genre interest.

Finally got around to reading Whit by Iain Banks, and I'm enjoying it. I read it in the loo.

I saw above someone is reading The Accord by Keith Brookes.... he deserves far more success! That book is brilliant, and great (and a bit demanding) fun to read.

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