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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 4:32 pm 
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Thanks, Mike - Robertson's matter of fact delivery and craggy face added an extra frisson to a very sinister poem. The volume on my pc is lousy so I managed to track down a printed version for anyone else who found it difficult to follow by ear:

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v30/n16/robin-robe ... roane-head

I had been going to post anothe Christmas poem today - a little slushy and sweet. But I think I'll leave it for another day after heaing this one!


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 5:36 pm 
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Found more readings and texts of this poet's work - really seriously good.
Thanks to Mike for introducing Mr Robertson!


http://www.poetryarchive.org/poetryarch ... oetId=7610


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2011 2:10 pm 
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NEW YEAR ON DARTMOOR

This is newness: every little tawdry
Obstacle glass-wrapped and peculiar,
Glinting and clinking in a saint's falsetto. Only you
Don't know what to make of the sudden slippiness,
The blind, white, awful, inaccessible slant.
There's no getting up it by the words you know.
No getting up by elephant or wheel or shoe.
We have only come to look. You are too new
To want the world in a glass hat.


—Sylvia Plath


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2011 2:12 pm 
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The Old Year
by
John Clare

The Old Year’s gone away
To nothingness and night:
We cannot find him all the day
Nor hear him in the night:
He left no footstep, mark or place
In either shade or sun:
The last year he’d a neighbour’s face,
In this he’s known as none.
All nothing everywhere:
Mists we on mornings see
Have more substance when they’re here
And more of form than he.
He was a friend by every fire,
In every cot and hall -
A guest to every heart’s desire,
And now he’s nought at all.

Old papers thrown away,
Old garments cast aside,
The talk of yesterday,
All things identified;
But times once torn away
No voices can recall:
The eve of New Year’s Day
Left the Old Year lost to all.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2012 6:32 pm 
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Carol Ann Duffy

guardian.co.uk, Friday 6 January 2012 22.55 GMT
Article history

Stephen Lawrence

Cold pavement indeed
the night you died,
murdered;
but the airborne drop of blood
from your wound
was a seed
your mother sowed
into hard ground –
your life's length doubled,
unlived, stilled,
till one flower, thorned,
bloomed
in her hand,
love's just blade.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2012 10:50 pm 
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For Burns' Night:

A Man's A Man For A' That


Is there for honest Poverty
That hings his head, an' a' that;
The coward slave-we pass him by,
We dare be poor for a' that!
For a' that, an' a' that.
Our toils obscure an' a' that,
The rank is but the guinea's stamp,
The Man's the gowd for a' that.

What though on hamely fare we dine,
Wear hoddin grey, an' a that;
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine;
A Man's a Man for a' that:
For a' that, and a' that,
Their tinsel show, an' a' that;
The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor,
Is king o' men for a' that.

Ye see yon birkie, ca'd a lord,
Wha struts, an' stares, an' a' that;
Tho' hundreds worship at his word,
He's but a coof for a' that:
For a' that, an' a' that,
His ribband, star, an' a' that:
The man o' independent mind
He looks an' laughs at a' that.

A prince can mak a belted knight,
A marquis, duke, an' a' that;
But an honest man's abon his might,
Gude faith, he maunna fa' that!
For a' that, an' a' that,
Their dignities an' a' that;
The pith o' sense, an' pride o' worth,
Are higher rank than a' that.

Then let us pray that come it may,
(As come it will for a' that,)
That Sense and Worth, o'er a' the earth,
Shall bear the gree, an' a' that.
For a' that, an' a' that,
It's coming yet for a' that,
That Man to Man, the world o'er,
Shall brothers be for a' that.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2012 10:54 pm 
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Two live performances of the song:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSoxa8Xp ... re=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BX9ubwgI ... re=related


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2012 10:57 pm 
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How about another song?

'The Braes O' Killiecrankie



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BX9ubwgI ... re=related


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2012 12:50 am 
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In memory of FP who dyed at Acton 24 May 1660 – 13th of her age

Katherine Phillips

If I could ever write a lasting verse,
It should be laid, deare Sainte, upon thy herse.
But Sorrow is no muse, and doth confesse
That it least can what most it would expresse.
Yet, that I may some bounds to griefe allow,
I'le try if I can weepe in numbers now.
Ah beauteous blossom! too untimely dead!
Whither, ah whither is thy sweetness fled?
Where are the charmes that allwayes did arise
From the prevailing language of thine eyes?
Where is thy modest aire and lovely meen,
And all the wonders that in these were seen?
Alas! in vaine! In vaine on thee I rave;
There is no pitty in the stupid grave …
Never, ah never let glad parents guesse
At one remove of future happinesse,
But reckon children 'mong those passing joys,
Which one hour gives, and the next hour destroyes.
Alas! we were secure of our content,
But find too late that it was onely lent,
To be a mirrour wherein we might see
How fraile we are, how innocent should be.
But if to thy blest soule my griefe appeares,
Forgive and pitty these injurious teares;
Impute them to affection's sad excesse,
Which will not yeild to nature's tendernesse,
Since 'twas through dearest tyes and highest trust
Continu'd from thy cradle to thy dust;
And so rewarded and confirm'd by thine,
(wo is me!) I thought thee too much mine.
But I'le resigne, and follow thee as fast
As my unhappy minutes will make hast.
Till when, the fresh remembrances of thee
Shall be my emblem of mortalitie.
For such a loss as thine, bright soule, is not
Ever to be repaired, or forgot.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 12:22 am 
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I am freaked out by this - Mew's poem was found pasted into the back of a notebook belonging to Myra Hindley:


Moorland Night

Charlotte Moor

My face is against the grass - the moorland grass is wet -
My eyes are shut against the grass, against my lips there are the little blades,
Over my head the curlews call, And now there is the night wind in my hair;
My heart is against the grass and the sweet earth, - it has gone still, at last;
It does not want to beat any more,
And why should it beat?
This is the end of the journey.
The Thing is found.

This is the end of all the roads -
Over the grass there is the night-dew
And the wind that drives up from the sea along the moorland road,
I hear a curlew start out from the heath
And fly off calling through the dusk,
The wild, long, rippling call -:
The Thing is found and I am quiet with the earth;
Perhaps the earth will hold it or the wind, or that bird's cry,
But it is not for long in any life I know. This cannot stay,
Not now, not yet, not in a dying world, with me, for very long;
I leave it here:
And one day the wet grass may give it back -
One day the quiet earth may give it back -
The calling birds may give it back as they go by -
To someone walking on the moor who starves for love and will not know
Who gave it to all these to give away;
Or, if I come and ask for it again
Oh! then, to me.


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 Post subject: Re: Poetry Thread 2
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 1:00 pm 
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I came across some Robert Frost today and have spent a great afternoon reading (justifying it as work - I might teach his poetry next year). Here's one I'm very fond of:

The Oft-Repeated Dream

She had no saying dark enough
For the dark pine that kept
Forever trying the window latch
Of the room where they slept.

The tireless but ineffectual hands
That with every futile pass
Made the great tree seem as a little bird
Before the mystery of glass!

It never had been inside the room,
And only one of the two
Was afraid in an oft-repeated dream
Of what the tree might do.


Robert Frost

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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 1:06 pm 
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Marion Arnott wrote:
I am freaked out by this - Mew's poem was found pasted into the back of a notebook belonging to Myra Hindley.


Really??!! That is almost too creepy, like an urban myth or something.

Oh, and isn't it Charlotte Mew? Although Moor is a very understandable typo!



Yes, it's Mew :oops:

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 Post subject: Re: Poetry Thread 2
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 10:54 pm 
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Slattern
by
Kate Clanchy

I leave myself about, slatternly,
bits of me, and times I liked:
I let them go on lying where
they fall, crumple, if they will,
I know fine how to make them walk
and breathe again. Sometimes at night,
or on the train, I dream I’m dancing,
or lying in someone’s arms who says
he loves my eyes in French, and again
and again I am walking up your road,
that first time, bidden and wanted,
the blossom on the trees, light,
light and buoyant. Pull yourself
together, they say, quite rightly,
but she is stubborn, that girl,
that hopeful one, still walking.


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 Post subject: Re: Poetry Thread 2
PostPosted: Fri Jun 22, 2012 12:47 pm 
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Something I'll be using at the start of my classes next year...

Introduction to Poetry

I ask them to take a poem
and hold it up to the light
like a color slide

or press an ear against its hive.

I say drop a mouse into a poem
and watch him probe his way out,

or walk inside the poem's room
and feel the walls for a light switch.

I want them to waterski
across the surface of a poem
waving at the author's name on the shore.

But all they want to do
is tie the poem to a chair with rope
and torture a confession out of it.

They begin beating it with a hose
to find out what it really means.


Billy Collins
(from The Apple that Astonished Paris, 1996)

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 Post subject: Re: Poetry Thread 2
PostPosted: Sat Jun 23, 2012 11:29 pm 
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Sorry, Ray, I missed this post yesterday. Have fun with the metaphors!


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