Small text iconNormal text iconLarge text icon

INTERACTION

 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MembersMembers   GroupsGroups   RegisterRegister 
 User Control PanelUser Control Panel      LoginLogin 


All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 279 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ... 19  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 11:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:46 am
Posts: 2663
Here's Ivor Gurney:

To his Love
He's gone, and all our plans
Are useless indeed.
We'll walk no more on Cotswold
Where the sheep feed
Quietly and take no heed.

His body that was so quick
Is not as you
Knew it, on Severn river
Under the blue
Driving our small boat through.

You would not know him now...
But still he died
Nobly, so cover him over
With violets of pride
Purple from Severn side.

Cover him, cover him soon!
And with thick-set
Masses of memoried flowers-
Hide that red wet
Thing I must somehow forget.

Ivor Gurney (1890-1937)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2007 11:58 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:46 am
Posts: 2663
Journeymouse wrote:
Marion Arnott wrote:
Mouse - are you sure 'My Boy Jack' is on tonight? I can't find it in the schedules.


In that case, guess not - I should pay more attention to adverts... Sorry :oops:


11th November for 'My Boy Jack', Mouse. When else?
Marion


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 12:05 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:46 am
Posts: 2663
Here's a little Kipling to get us in the mood for the play:



THE YOUNG BRITISH SOLDIER


When the 'arf-made recruity goes out to the East
'E acts like a babe an' 'e drinks like a beast,
An' 'e wonders because 'e is frequent deceased
Ere 'e's fit for to serve as a soldier.
Serve, serve, serve as a soldier,
Serve, serve, serve as a soldier,
Serve, serve, serve as a soldier,
So-oldier ~OF~ the Queen!

Now all you recruities what's drafted to-day,
You shut up your rag-box an' 'ark to my lay,
An' I'll sing you a soldier as far as I may:
A soldier what's fit for a soldier.
Fit, fit, fit for a soldier . . .

First mind you steer clear o' the grog-sellers' huts,
For they sell you Fixed Bay'nets that rots out your guts --
Ay, drink that 'ud eat the live steel from your butts --
An' it's bad for the young British soldier.
Bad, bad, bad for the soldier . . .

When the cholera comes -- as it will past a doubt --
Keep out of the wet and don't go on the shout,
For the sickness gets in as the liquor dies out,
An' it crumples the young British soldier.
Crum-, crum-, crumples the soldier . . .

But the worst o' your foes is the sun over'ead:
You ~must~ wear your 'elmet for all that is said:
If 'e finds you uncovered 'e'll knock you down dead,
An' you'll die like a fool of a soldier.
Fool, fool, fool of a soldier . . .

If you're cast for fatigue by a sergeant unkind,
Don't grouse like a woman nor crack on nor blind;
Be handy and civil, and then you will find
That it's beer for the young British soldier.
Beer, beer, beer for the soldier . . .

Now, if you must marry, take care she is old --
A troop-sergeant's widow's the nicest I'm told,
For beauty won't help if your rations is cold,
Nor love ain't enough for a soldier.
'Nough, 'nough, 'nough for a soldier . . .

If the wife should go wrong with a comrade, be loath
To shoot when you catch 'em -- you'll swing, on my oath! --
Make 'im take 'er and keep 'er: that's Hell for them both,
An' you're shut o' the curse of a soldier.
Curse, curse, curse of a soldier . . .

When first under fire an' you're wishful to duck,
Don't look nor take 'eed at the man that is struck,
Be thankful you're livin', and trust to your luck
And march to your front like a soldier.
Front, front, front like a soldier . . .

When 'arf of your bullets fly wide in the ditch,
Don't call your Martini a cross-eyed old bitch;
She's human as you are -- you treat her as sich,
An' she'll fight for the young British soldier.
Fight, fight, fight for the soldier . . .

When shakin' their bustles like ladies so fine,
The guns o' the enemy wheel into line,
Shoot low at the limbers an' don't mind the shine,
For noise never startles the soldier.
Start-, start-, startles the soldier . . .

If your officer's dead and the sergeants look white,
Remember it's ruin to run from a fight:
So take open order, lie down, and sit tight,
And wait for supports like a soldier.
Wait, wait, wait like a soldier . . .

When you're wounded and left on Afghanistan's plains,
And the women come out to cut up what remains,
Jest roll to your rifle and blow out your brains
An' go to your Gawd like a soldier.
Go, go, go like a soldier,
Go, go, go like a soldier,
Go, go, go like a soldier,
So-oldier ~of~ the Queen!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 9:23 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:19 am
Posts: 243
Location: Sheffield, UK
I found copies of Jarmains' Poems and Priddy Barrows on abebooks.com, and ordered them. There were only two copies of Priddy Barrows available (only one now :-)) - and despite some intensive googling, I couldn't find any copies anywhere else. There were more copies of Poems, but even then it was less than a dozen. and yet, if you google for war poetry, Jarmain's name pops up quite often...

_________________
http://iansales.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 7:31 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:46 am
Posts: 2663
Remember to let us know about the novel, Ian!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2007 1:43 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:19 am
Posts: 243
Location: Sheffield, UK
The novel was waiting for me when I got back from Novacon. I've added it to my LibraryThing catalog (see the book itself here). Unsurprisingly, the databases they access did not have a record of it, and I had to add it manually. I'll be starting the book later in the week.

_________________
http://iansales.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2007 4:44 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:46 am
Posts: 2663
The library site is very impressive, Ian. I look forward to your comments.
Marion


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2007 9:26 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:19 am
Posts: 243
Location: Sheffield, UK
The book of John Jarmain's poems has arrived (I'm halfway through his novel, Priddy Barrows), and some of the poems are really very very good. In places, he reminds me a great deal of Owen, although he seems more observant of nature than Owen ever was.

This one reminds me of Owen's Le Christianisme:

Tel-el-Eisa
Tel-el-Eisa is Jesus' hill,
Or so they say:
There the bitter guns were never still,
Throwing up yellow plumes of sand by day
And piercing the night across.
There the desert telephone's long lonely line expires,
Ends with a tangle of looping wires
And one last leaning cross.

_________________
http://iansales.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2007 9:29 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:19 am
Posts: 243
Location: Sheffield, UK
Here's another, longer one - the last poem in the collection:

Beginnings
In their beginning, how muddled, lose and crude
Are all great things men make upon the earth;
The painting in a few smudged charcoal lines,
The tall-arched church in awkward stones, not trued,
And heaps of lime and sand and paper plans.
The woman's cries, the pain and blood of birth
For a man first made; the uncouth attitude
And shamefaced lovely lust of his conceiving.

But this burst house with smoking twisted stair,
These scattered limbs in fields of asphodel,
These are an end whose beginning is elsewhere--
In the smooth bright shapely shell
And the great gun lifted gleaming in the air,
Perfect with all the skill of men's contriving.

That second verse could be Owen's Sonnet: On Seeing a Piece of our Heavy Artillery Brought into Action, but that first verse strikes me as uniquely Jarmain.

_________________
http://iansales.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2007 9:32 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:19 am
Posts: 243
Location: Sheffield, UK
And finally, two of the strongest poems in the collection are too long to post here - The Innocent Shall Suffer and The God in the Valley. The latter is about the passing of Pan, I particularly like the imagery of the last verse:

So the wind of prophecy is very still:
He is so gone,
Or my own self so strangely turned away,
That forfeit is the fleet and silver day
And autumn quite passed on.

_________________
http://iansales.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2007 10:16 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:46 am
Posts: 2663
Thanks for those, Ian. These are very good indeed.'The first stamza of 'Beginnings' is truly wonderful and the last is chilling - perfection in destructiveness That reminds me of owen's 'Futility' in a tangential way-
'was it for this the clay grew tall?'

I also liked the image of 'the last hanging cross' in Tel-el-Eisa - I agree it echoes 'Le Christianisme'.

The God In The Valley sounds good. How resonant are those lines 'The wind of prophecy is very still' and the forfeit of 'the fleet and silver day'.

I really appreciate these psostings, Ian.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2007 10:21 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:46 am
Posts: 2663
http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forum ... 342858.jpg

Here's an image of a last hanging cross - Crucifix Corner 1918


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2007 10:34 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 10:00 am
Posts: 635
Location: Swansea
With Remembrance Sunday this week-end I thought I'd put my poem Cenotaph here. This was published in 1994 after I paid a visit to the one on Swansea's foreshore and saw amongst other things that some idiot had taken the effort to climb to the top and impale a beer can on the soldier's bayonet. Made me pretty angry.

CENOTAPH

I was white once—now a faded yellow
Respected once—now a surface for graffiti
Remembered once—now rarely paid homage to
Ahh, once…
…once people cared

I am granite faced—granite hard
Made to stand the test of time.
To carry memorials of brave men
But memories erode whilst granite stands fast

Now I am but a refuge for pigeons
A sheltered place for drunks.
People still stop and stare
But not at the names of fallen heroes

They see pigeons to feed
They see discarded bottles—the fools who emptied them
They don't see the cost in men’s lives that I portray
They don't see the sad shades that haunt this place

I was white once...

_________________
My Blog: http://bob-lock.blogspot.com/

Debut novel site: http://www.flamesofherakleitos.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2007 10:43 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:19 am
Posts: 243
Location: Sheffield, UK
This weekend, I'll see if I can transcribe the two long poems I mentioned. There's also one about a man ploughing field which has some excellent imagery. I don't see there being any copyright problems - the poems are, after all, 63 years old and have been out of print in all that time :-)

_________________
http://iansales.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 10, 2007 4:10 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:46 am
Posts: 2663
:lol: I was hoping you would say that, Ian - was wondering if t was quite fair to drop a hint...
Well, you've saved me the trouble. Thank you!

Bob - a modern day problem. A number of CWGC headstones on the Somme were graffitied the other week. But I'm glad to say cleaned up very quickly.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 279 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ... 19  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group